Just Accepted Paper

Sibel’s paper titled “CRY1-CBS binding regulates circadian clock function and metabolism” is accepted to be published in The FEBS Journal.

This paper provide a novel insight that CBS-CRY1 binding provides a post-translational switch to modulate cellular circadian physiology and metabolic control.

The mechanisms coupling circadian rhythms and metabolism remain poorly understood. We find that the core circadian protein Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) binds Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), a central enzyme in one-carbon metabolism. This binding modulates the activity of both proteins. During the active phase, CBS augments CRY1 mediated repression of BMAL1/CLOCK driven transcription. During the rest phase, CRY1 increases CBS enzymatic activity.

Just Published Paper

Yamur and Darya’s paper titled “A CLOCK-binding small molecule disrupts the interaction between CLOCK and BMAL1 and enhances circadian rhythm amplitude” is published in Journal of Biological Chemistry. 295(11):3518-3531

This paper describe the discovery of the small molecules has potential to be used as drug to eliminate circadian clock related diseases in ageing.

A schematic presentation of CLK8 affecting CLOCK and the circadian rhythm. CLOCK and BMAL1 are dynamically interacting. When CLK8 is present, it binds to CLOCK and reduces CLOCK and BMAL1 interaction. Upon binding of CLK8 to CLOCK, the translocation of the CLOCK into nucleus abolished. At the cellular level, CLK8 enhances the amplitude of the circadian rhythm. The role of CLOCK in regulating the circadian clock amplitude can be investigated using CLK8 to transiently modulate CLOCK. Thin line indicates reduction in strength of positive arm of TTFL while Thick line represent enhanced strength of negative arm of TTFL

Just Published Paper

Meriçs’ paper titled “Identification and characterization of a new class of (6-4) photolyase from Vibrio cholerae” is published in Biochemistry. 58(43):4352-4360. doi: 10.1021/acs.biochem.9b00766.

Figure 1
Purification and spectroscopic analysis of recombinant V. cholerae iron–sulfur bacterial cryptochromes and photolyases (FeS-BCP). (A) Coomassie staining. Purified VCA0809 and the cell free extract (CFE) of E. coli expressing MBP-Vc(6–4)FeS-BCP were separated via 10% SDS–PAGE and visualized by being stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue: L, ladder; Un, uninduced CFE; In, induced CFE; (6–4), MBP-Vc(6–4) FeS-BCP fusion protein. (B) Absorption spectra of Vc(6–4) MBP-FeS-BCP protein from 250 to 750 nm. The inset shows the expanded scale of the absorption spectrum from 300 to 700 nm. Fluorescence spectra of MBP-Vc(6–4) FeS-BCP with (C) folate and (D) flavin excitation emission wavelengths.

Circadian Clock

Our laboratory is interested in understanding how clock works at cellular level. For more information please visit our research interest section. 

Almost every day, we wake up, get hungry, feel ourselves energetic or tired or succumb to sleep at the same hours. Although people may have different cycles, at certain hours of the day our bodies show the same responses. The circadian clock regulates the timing of sleep and wakefulness and, therefore, all dependent behavioural and physiological processes. In humans, a defect in the clock gene PER2 produces familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS); an analogous mutation causes the same phenotype in mice. People with a causal mutation in casein kinase CSNK1D and an associated variant in CSNK1E display ASPS and delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), respectively. Finally, a human CLOCK variant is associated with diurnal sleep preference. Circadian clock genes are also associated with a host of neurological disorders including schizophrenia, unipolar major depression, and bipolar disorder.  Although it was widely believed that circadian clock disruption predisposes humans to cancer based largely on epidemiologic data, studies with Cry mutant mice revealed a more complex pattern of interactions among the clock, apoptosis, and oncogenic transformation.